Are Sesame Sticks Healthy?

Between-meal snacks may play a crucial role in your diet plan if you feel hungry and need an energy boost during the day. The calories in these foods, however, can quickly add up if you are not careful. With a considerable amount of fat, sesame sticks are no exception and should be eaten in small portions.

A bowl of homemade sesame sticks. (Image: bhofack2/iStock/Getty Images)

Fat

Sesame sticks are a good source of fat, with 10.4 g in just 1 oz., or 16 percent of the daily value, based on a 2,000-calorie diet. Of this fat, 1.8 g is saturated. Because they contain a lot of fat, sesame sticks are also relatively high in calories, with 153 in 1 oz. Although most of the fat found in sesame seeds is heart-healthy unsaturated fat, it is important to consume small amounts to keep your caloric intake under control.

Protein

Although sesame sticks are not high in protein, they do contain a little bit, with about 3 g in 1 oz. Protein is involved in the building and repair of the body's tissues. In addition, it is important as part of a weight-loss plan, as it slows the emptying of food from the stomach and keeps you satisfied throughout the day. Sesame sticks are not as high in protein as some other snacks, such as nuts.

Fiber

Sesame sticks do not contain much fiber, with only 0.8 g in 1 oz. Foods containing fiber are among the best choices between meals, as fiber holds food in the stomach and helps stave off hunger. If you would like to add some fiber to your snack, try consuming a small portion of sesame sticks and a small amount of a fiber-containing food, such as a fruit. Most nuts also contain a few grams of fiber.

Vitamins and Minerals

Sesame sticks are an excellent source of calcium, with 48 percent of the daily value in 1 oz. They also contain small amounts of other nutrients, such as potassium, vitamin B-6 and zinc. Watch out for the sodium found in this snack; 1 oz. contains 18 percent of the daily value. The American diet is generally far too high in sodium from processed foods; this nutrient should be limited in the diet due to the increased risk of heart disease when consumed in excess.

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