How to Roast Russet Potatoes

Potatoes russet or baking in bulk
Russet potatoes for sale at a market. (Image: jatrax/iStock/Getty Images)

Russet is one of the most versatile types of potatoes, suitable for frying, mashing, baking and roasting. They are often called Idaho potatoes after the top producing state that grows roughly 11.5 billion lbs. of them each year. Russet potatoes are relatively low in calories, with only 160 calories in a medium potato. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also labels them as a good source of dietary fiber, vitamin C and potassium.

Step 1

Wash the potatoes thoroughly. Peel the potatoes, if desired, or leave the skin intact. Cut the potatoes into 1.5-inch chunks.

Step 2

Place cut-up potatoes into a large pot filled with salted water. Set over high heat, cover and bring to a boil. Cook the potatoes for five minutes from the time the water boils. Drain and set the potatoes in a large bowl. Allow the potatoes to cool. You can make the potatoes to this point up to one day ahead of time if you keep them in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

Step 3

Preheat the oven to 400 F.

Step 4

Pour 2 to 3 tbsp. olive oil into the bottom of a roasting pan. Add the potato chunks. Season with salt and pepper. Toss the potatoes with your hands, evenly coating them with the olive oil and seasonings.

Step 5

Place the potatoes in the preheated oven on the middle rack. Roast the potatoes for 30 to 40 minutes until golden brown; turn the potatoes with a spoon once or twice during the cooking process.

Things You'll Need

  • Russet potatoes

  • Cutting board

  • Sharp knife

  • Large pot

  • Colander

  • Roasting pan

  • Olive oil

  • Kosher or sea salt

  • Coarsely ground black pepper

Tip

Add chopped onions, green bell peppers, garlic powder and paprika to the potatoes before roasting for a flavorful side dish. Give the cooked potatoes a fresh-from-the-garden taste by topping them with fresh herbs.

Warning

Never freeze or refrigerate raw russet potatoes. Store them in a ventilated, dry space kept between 45 and 55 degrees F. Russet potatoes have a high starch content that will turn to sugar when they become too cold. Diabetics should avoid white potatoes in general, as they have a relatively high glycemic index rating of 76.

REFERENCES & RESOURCES
Comments
PARTNER & LICENSEE OF THE LIVESTRONG FOUNDATION

Copyright © 2018 Leaf Group Ltd. Use of this web site constitutes acceptance of the LIVESTRONG.COM Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Copyright Policy. The material appearing on LIVESTRONG.COM is for educational use only. It should not be used as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. LIVESTRONG is a registered trademark of the LIVESTRONG Foundation. The LIVESTRONG Foundation and LIVESTRONG.COM do not endorse any of the products or services that are advertised on the web site. Moreover, we do not select every advertiser or advertisement that appears on the web site-many of the advertisements are served by third party advertising companies.