How to Cook Whole Foods Pizza Dough

Whole Foods Market's mission is offering consumers healthy natural and organic foods, and Whole Foods pizza dough fits well with that goal. Whole Foods Market pizza dough contains just a handful of ingredients, including organic flour, and is available in a whole-wheat variety.

Whole Foods pizza crust bakes up in less than 15 minutes.
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Whole Foods pizza crust bakes up in less than 15 minutes. If you aren't using it right away, freeze it for up to three months.

Read more: 10 Dairy-Free Pizzas So Good You Won't Miss the Mozz

Step 1: Thaw the Dough

Remove the frozen dough from the freezer and set it in the refrigerator overnight to thaw. You can also set it on the counter 1 1/2 to 2 hours before you plan to bake the pizza.

Step 2: Warm to Room Temperature

If you thawed the dough in the refrigerator overnight, set the thawed dough on the counter 30 minutes before baking time. Allowing the dough to warm up makes it softer and easier to roll out.

Step 3: Prep Your Pan

Heat the oven to 450 degrees Fahrenheit. A hot oven is essential for making a crisp crust when using a Whole Foods pizza crust. If you're using a metal pan, spray it with a nonstick cooking spray. Rub a pizza stone lightly with oil, according to manufacturer's directions.

Step 4: Flatten the Dough

Sprinkle the counter top with flour or cornmeal. Lightly press the thawed dough out on the counter top to flatten it. Pick it up and carefully stretch the dough between your fingers, turning it as you work. The dough should be about 1/4 inch thick when done.

Step 5: Top Your Pizza

Place the dough on the pizza pan or stone. Spread marinara sauce, ranch dressing or a drizzle of olive oil over the pizza, depending on your preferences. Top the pizza with cheese, meat, herbs and garlic. Give it a dash of kosher salt and pepper if desired.

Add a colorful array of veggies to your pizza for a healthy source of vitamins and minerals. According to the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, a person eating a 2,000-calorie-per-day diet should consume a 2.5-cup equivalent of vegetables daily.

For a healthier pizza, add lower-fat meats, such as ground chicken or turkey breast, instead of sausage or ground beef. Poultry breast is lower in saturated fats — the "bad" kind that can increase your risk of heart disease, according to Mayo Clinic.

Top your pizza with low-fat or nonfat cheese to help meet the 3-cup-equivalent daily dairy intake recommendations made by ChooseMyPlate.gov.

Step 6: Bake Until Crisp

Bake the pizza on the lowest oven rack in the oven for eight to 12 minutes or until the crust is brown and the cheese is bubbly and melted.

Step 7: Cool and Serve

Cool the pizza on a hot pad or cooling rack for 10 minutes before slicing it. Cooling allows the cheese to set and makes the crust easier to cut. Slice into individual pieces and serve.

Read more: How Many Calories Are in a Slice of Cheese Pizza?

Things You'll Need

  • Pizza pan or baking stone

  • Nonstick cooking spray or oil

  • Flour or cornmeal

  • Marinara sauce, ranch dressing or olive oil

  • Grated cheese

  • Meat

  • Vegetables

  • Herbs

  • Garlic

  • Salt and pepper

  • Cooling rack or hot pad

  • Pizza slicer

Tips

Pizza stones help create a crispy, browned crust.

Perforated pizza pans have tiny holes to allow heat to penetrate the bottom of the crust so that it cooks evenly.

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