Chinese Shrimp & Broccoli Nutrition

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When it comes to healthy cuisine, Chinese food, with its emphasis on lean meats, vegetables and healthy oils tops the list. Including entrees like Chinese shrimp and broccoli can be a delicious way for you to increase both your seafood and vegetable intake. However, depending on the recipe and the chef, some versions of Chinese shrimp and broccoli can be high in sodium. Knowing the nutrition information for different versions of the dish can help you determine how Chinese shrimp and broccoli can fit into your diet.

Calories

Calories can vary significantly in a serving of Chinese shrimp and broccoli. A serving of Chinese shrimp and broccoli from three different Chinese restaurants, on average, contains 314 calories. To save a significant number of calories, you can make your own shrimp and broccoli at home. One serving from a traditional recipe that includes shrimp, broccoli, mushrooms, vegetable oil, soy sauce, sherry, garlic and ginger contains only 148 calories.

Fat

Whether eating out or at home, Chinese shrimp and broccoli makes a low-fat choice, with less than 20 percent of calories coming from fat. A serving of Chinese shrimp and broccoli from the three restaurants, on average, contains 8 g of total fat, 2 g of saturated fat and 175 mg of cholesterol. The homemade version from the traditional recipe contains 8 g of total fat, 1 g of saturated fat and 86 mg of cholesterol. The shrimp in the Chinese shrimp and broccoli accounts for its high cholesterol content. However, the cholesterol in the shrimp will not raise blood cholesterol levels in most people, according to HealthCastle.com.

Carbohydrates and Fiber

The restaurant version of Chinese shrimp and broccoli is higher in carbohydrates and fiber than the homemade version. One serving from a restaurant, on average, contains 18 g of carbohydrates and 9 g of fiber, meeting 36 percent of your daily fiber needs. The homemade version contains 6 g of carbohydrates and 1 g of fiber per serving.

Protein

The protein content also varies when comparing the restaurant version of Chinese shrimp and broccoli to a homemade version using a traditional recipe. A restaurant serving, on average, contains 31 g of protein, meeting more than 50 percent of your daily value for protein. The homemade version contains only 13 g of protein, meeting 26 percent of your daily value.

Sodium

The restaurant version of Chinese shrimp and broccoli is significantly higher in sodium than the homemade version. One serving of Chinese shrimp and broccoli from three different restaurants, on average, contains 1,581 mg of sodium, meeting 65 percent of your daily value for sodium. One serving of the homemade version contains just 248 mg of sodium, meeting only 10 percent of your daily value for sodium. High intakes of sodium increase your risk of high blood pressure, and your daily intake should be less than 2,300 mg per day.

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