Good Breakfast for People With High Triglycerides

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Berries and yogurt can start your day off on a sweet but healthy note. (Image: carpaumar/iStock/Getty Images)

Conditions such as diabetes and kidney failure can be exacerbated by a diet that increases your triglyceride levels. Unused dietary calories become triglycerides that circulate in your bloodstream and negatively affect your blood cholesterol. This puts you at greater risk for heart attack and stroke. Some breakfast foods, such as fatty meats and sweetened baked goods, can raise your triglyceride levels. The American Diabetes Association recommends foods low in fat and cholesterol. Emphasize fresh fruits, vegetables and whole grains within a 60 g limit on carbohydrates -- nutrients your body stores as triglycerides.

Orange Juice

Get your potassium and vitamin C first thing in the morning, along with some natural sweetness from oranges and no fat or cholesterol. To control carbs and sugar, the American Heart Association recommends limiting juice servings to 1/2 cup. Fresh-squeezed orange juice provides 100 percent of your daily vitamin C and 13 g of carbs per 1/2 cup, with canned and frozen varieties slightly lower in vitamin content.

Yogurt and Strawberries

Together, yogurt and strawberries provide high calcium, protein and vitamins B and C. For a breakfast entree with no fat and very low cholesterol, choose 8 oz. of plain nonfat yogurt, which contains 16 g of carbs. Alternate 1/2-cup servings of strawberries with 1/4-cup servings of blueberries from day to day to vary your breakfast while keeping the carbohydrate count at 6 g or less.

Broiled Tomato and Canadian Bacon

Hit the vegetable group for the fiber, iron, potassium and vitamins A, B, C and E in tomatoes and the protein group for low-fat, low-cholesterol Canadian-style bacon. Broil a half tomato dusted with Parmesan cheese and separately broil one slice of Canadian bacon, then combine. Your fat and carb totals will remain under 3 g, with cholesterol at 12 mg.

Whole-Wheat Toast and Almond Butter

Use one slice of reduced-calorie bread to provide whole-grain nutrition with 10 g of carbohydrates and less fat than regular bread. Whole wheat provides more fiber, iron and B vitamins than refined white flour. Almond butter boosts your protein, iron, calcium and vitamin E totals. About half of its 9 g of total fat is monounsaturated fat, which the American Diabetes Association recommends for its benefit to blood cholesterol balance. Peanut butter instead of almond butter will give you similar macronutrient content, including about 3 g of carbs, and slightly lower levels of vitamins and minerals.

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