The Minimalist Diet

Mid adult woman holding fruits
Enjoy less expensive fruit on your minimalist diet by eating fruits in season. (Image: Blend Images/Blend Images/Getty Images)

There is no specific minimalist diet, but as a lifestyle, minimalism takes into account food choices and diet. Minimalism is about living as simply as possible and focusing on what's most important. It's a belief that's aimed at promoting the positive. Health and fitness are important aspects of minimalism, and diet is about eating simple inexpensive foods.

About the Diet

The minimalist diet encourages you to eat foods from all the food groups so that you get the nutrition you need but to choose the ones that are the least expensive -- for example, selecting a fresh apple as a snack instead of a container of raspberries. You are also encouraged to drink only water and to eliminate all junk food. You are also discouraged from eating too much, which helps expense and prevents weight gain caused by overeating.

Benefits of Eating Simply

Instead of counting calories, a minimalist takes simplicity and cost into consideration. You might think of the minimalist diet as a frugal version of the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Eating a diet filled with nutrient-rich foods as suggested by those that follow a minimalist lifestyle offers a number of health benefits, including lowering your risk of heart disease, diabetes and certain types of cancer. It's also helpful in promoting a healthy weight.

Cons of Eating Simply

As a minimalist, you may find it easy to follow the diet because it is part of your lifestyle. However, the minimalist diet is very strict, omitting all junk food, as well as drink choices with the exception of water. Diets that restrict intake to such extremes are difficult to follow long term, according to the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Also, some may find the diet bland and boring, which also may impede diet longevity.

Sample Meal Plan

A minimalist breakfast might include a bowl of regular oats made with water and served with a banana and a cup of milk. Lunch could be lettuce greens topped with cucumbers, onions, garbanzo beans, vinegar and oil and served with slices of whole-wheat bread and an apple. A healthy and simple dinner might include baked chicken with a baked potato and steamed broccoli. Snack options might include seasonal fresh fruit, carrot and celery sticks or whole-grain crackers.

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